Make NaNoWriMo the Gift that Keeps on Giving

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Today’s post is written by Amanda L. Barbara. For writers just cooling down from NaNoWriMo, it’s tempting to lose steam as the holidays approach. Your weekend calendar is filling up with parties and family get-togethers, and you probably feel like you deserve a victory lap after a month of such high productivity. But whether or not […]

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Three Pitfalls of Foreshadowing

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Today’s post is written by Amanda Bumgarner. Two years ago I read Stephen King’s newest (at the time) novel, 11/22/63. I was hesitant at first, not being a fan of horror and never having previously read one of King’s novels. But it came highly recommended from a friend I trusted, so I gave it a shot. Thus […]

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Use a Nonlinear Format to Grab Your Reader by the Eyeballs

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Today’s post is written by author Clayton Lindemuth. Reviewers and editors have commended the nonlinear format of Cold Quiet Country—a novel set in a single day, but with shards of backstory scattered across almost every page. Two dueling first-person narrators vie to control the story, each slipping into escalating past-tense flashbacks. A fifth viewpoint—of the […]

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What Charlotte Brontë Taught Me About Writing

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Today’s post is written by regular contributor Benison O’Reilly. I like to mix up my fiction reading—commercial versus literary, classics versus contemporary. A year or so ago, I decided to tackle Elizabeth Gaskell’s North and South. Mrs. Gaskell, as she was simply known, was a contemporary of Charles Dickens and the novel has been described […]

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How to Enrich a Story with ‘Strategic Humour’

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Today’s post is written by regular contributor Dr John Yeoman. Why do we laugh? Could it be a defence mechanism? We hear the punchline of a joke. It shocks us. Danger! We expose our canine teeth. Then we realise the joke’s harmless and we relax. Our tension is released as laughter. Of course, jokes relax […]

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When Fear Is a Good Thing for Your Writing

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Today’s article is written by regular contributor Christi Craig. The summer I turned fifteen, my father came into possession of a used Vespa: shiny, red, and in excellent shape. It sat in the garage for weeks at first, and I imagined myself taking it out, sitting on the leather seat a few times with the kickstand […]

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